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Resolve to Play Music In Your Office

January 13, 2017

 

Today marks the end of the second week of January.  Statistically speaking, about 70% of us are still going strong with our New Year’s resolution.  Within another two weeks, that will drop to 60% - but still more than half of us are proactively working toward self-improvement.  

 

Here’s the question:  are half of us proactively working toward improving our business?  Asked a different way:  how many of us have established a New Year’s resolution for our business?  If you have not yet done so, it’s not too late! 

 

So what even is a resolution?  It’s a firm decision to do something (or even not to do something).  To make things easy, we have a suggestion for something you can do – something that is easy to implement without a lot of planning or effort.

 

Studies have proven that music plays a huge role in increasing staff production and boosting employee morale in an office setting.  The tempo of the music can influence the speed in which your employees work.  Consider the following:  a study* involving 72 staff members working in a data input department of a processing center found that after three weeks of being exposed daily to fast tempo music, slow tempo music, or no music at all, productivity increased by 22% on the days fast music was played. 

 

Not only that, but playing music has proven to result in a happier (and therefore more engaged and productive) workforce.  As part of the aforementioned study, employees were invited to complete a questionnaire at the end of each day, after being exposed to fast tempo, slow tempo, or no music.  After fast music was played, the end-of-day survey revealed that employees found the work environment “motivating” and that “there was a good atmosphere” in the office.  Conversely, when no music was played, comments included “it was boring” and “I feel lethargic.” 

 

So we encourage you to softly broadcast an up-tempo playlist throughout your office.  If your office isn’t equipped for that, encourage employees to listen to music through earbuds while working. 

 

Consider this final statistic:  people who make resolutions to improve themselves, or their business, are 10x more likely to attain their other goals than those who do not.   So consider making a New Year’s resolution to play music throughout your office.  Survey your workforce before you implement the change, then conduct a second survey three weeks in.  If you find that morale and production have increased, you’ve successfully implemented an improvement in your office that took very little time, money, or effort!

 

Please contact us with any assistance you may need implementing this idea, conducting the climate surveys, and evaluating the data/stats! 

 

*Source:  A. North, D. Hargreaves (1999) – Music Tempo, Productivity and Morale.

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